An Out Of Body Experience

Astral Projection

Have you ever had an out of body experience? I had one, and it was the scariest feeling ever! It was not my intention but somehow I made my way outwards, floating in the air and then…I panicked!

After my horrific experience, I questioned: “Will this happen when I die?” Will I experience the same feeling?”

My experience exposed a wild, imbalanced and clingy mind. If it is my mind that continues to exist after this life, then it makes sense to get to know it and train it. Meditation is a great tool for the mind. It means effortlessly remaining in whatever is. It creates the necessary distance to whatever we experience, it shows us the way things really are in life and creates the awareness of my true nature, of who I truly am.

In Buddhism we have a lot of meditation techniques. I choose Buddhist meditations, as I can trust in Buddha’s methods. He is the one who reached enlightenment (as they say, he got the ticket!) and left us various teachings, meditations and he onced said: “Don’t believe because a Buddha told you, check it out for yourself.”

Diamond Way Teachings 

The Wheel of Life, Samsara

 

Samsara also known as the wheel of life, turns continually because of our ripened karma. Our actions and karma accumulate and through this our experiences manifest in Samsara.

When we create mainly positive actions, we will experience a more or less joyful result. When we have mainly negative actions, we mainly experience unpleasant results.

To be unenlightened means we separate a ‘me’ from a ‘you’. We have been in this state of duality since time without beginning. The cause for this way of perception is the fundamental ignorance of our minds: our mind works like an eye. It looks at the outside, but cannot see itself and so the separation between me and you, outside and inside, here and there arises.

As a result from this duality, we wish to have certain things we experience as separate from ourselves that leads to attachment. Now that we’ve attached ourselves, we know what we want, and we wish to avoid certain things we don’t want, so aversion arises. From our attachment greed arises, as we want more of that what we like and from our aversion to things, jealousy arises as we don’t want others to have that what we have and from our ignorance pride arises because we don’t want to share what we have.

We call the above the five disturbing emotions that make us say and do certain things. Because of the law of cause and effect (Karma) our actions return to us. We create habitual tendencies from our disturbing emotions, thus finding ourselves in the wheel of existence, Samsara.

We can differentiate between six different kinds of experiences or states of existence within Samsara:

  1. God states
  2. Half-god existence
  3. Human existence
  4. Animal existences
  5. Ghost states
  6. Paranoia realms

In all the above states of existence, there is suffering. Samsara is nothing but suffering because it is simply the result of accumulated actions through our disturbing emotions. At times, the wheel turns upwards and then down again. We experience these states as real, although according to Buddhist teachings, they lack reality.

Our problem is that we take everything for real existent as we cling or we reject it. The Buddhist path shows us how to realize the true nature of mind and freeing ourselves from Samsara. For more information on Diamond Way Teachings 

 

Cause and Effect

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Cause and effect, known as karma is not the same as fate. It is the basis of personal freedom and universal responsibility for all living beings. Logically, positive causes cannot bring about negative results and vice versa.

According to the Buddha, four conditions come together for a karmic impression to come to full effect (positive or negative):

  1. A being has to understand clearly its own position and the corresponding conditions, meaning one must know exactly what one is doing and the consequences of such an action.
  2. It has to have the wish, to influence them actively, meaning one wants to and has a need to do this.
  3. The being must do something accordingly or have others do it meaning one does the deed or allows others to do it.
  4. The being has to be satisfied with the results.

When these four conditions come together, a fully developed karmic impression develops, which is stored in our consciousness. So the karma is the strongest when all four conditions come together and the weakest when only one condition is present. This counts for all our actions.

The stream of consciousness flows from birth to birth. In every situation we digest and dissolve old impressions and at the same time, we store new impressions into our minds. For this reason, Buddha never taught karma in a dogmatic way or as a moralist like “You must not …” or “You always have to …”.

A conscious understanding of the way cause and effect work can support you as an individual to create beautiful, positive impressions and to benefit beings in the ‘cycle of existence’ with wisdom and spontaneous activity.

This article was inspired by my Buddhist teacher, Lama Ole Nydahl   

Buddha Shakyamuni
Buddha Shakyamuni (Photo credit: Wikipedia